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Nanaquiba [Water Moccasin]


Recognized historically as one of the most powerful leaders and warriors among the Michigan and Indiana Potawatomi.  He was a veteran of the French and Indian War, fighting with the Native-French alliance at the siege of Ft. William Henry. The qualities that earned him respect were passed down to his sons, Topinabee, Chebass and Shissahecon, who would also play pivotal …

Navarre, Pierre


Born at Detroit, Pierre Navarre is recognized as the first non-Native settler of Michigan’s St. Joseph River Valley. From Monroe, Michigan, Navarre was considered well-educated and a top agent for the American Fur Company. He would later leave the American Fur Company to establish his own trading post along the St. Joseph River. His experience in trapping and trading with …

Negahnquet, Albert


Father Albert Negahnquet, also known as Dom Bede, was Citizen Potawatomi and the first full‐blood American Indian ordained Roman Catholic priest in the United States. Oral stories tell us that at a young age, Albert “wanted to educate the Potawatomi people in the teachings of the Bible in their own language.” Understanding his son’s path, Albert’s father Nebawqua or Stephen …

Negahnquet, Stephen


Born on the Kansas River Reservation, Stephen Negahnquet quickly rose to become a community fixture in Kansas. After the Treaty of 1867, he removed with his family to Indian Territory and was allotted several sections of land. He is listed on the 1872 Citizen Potawatomi allotment census as well as recorded first on the 1887 Dawes allotment census. On the …

Neswake [Fletcher of Arrows]


Neswake was a leader of much influence and distinguished orator among the Wabash Potawatomi. He served as principle speaker for the Indiana Potawatomi during land cession and removal negotiations. Neswake gave the keynote address at the 1837 Keewaunay emigration council, expressing grievances and deep concern regarding the survival of his people post-removal. Despite his mixed opposition to removal, his name …

Nibosh [Humble Death or Twisted Head]


A warrior of great distinction among the Wabash Potawatomi of Indiana, Nibosh was a veteran of the Battle of Tippecanoe (1811) and the greater War of 1812. His name, translated as Humble Death or Twisted Head, indicated both his prowess in battle and physical appearance, due to the numerous injuries he sustained. After being captured and scalped during an inter-tribal …

Northwest Indian War


Post revolution America was riddled with conflict as settlers began encroaching on Native lands, unlawfully ceded to the United States by Great Britain. Rejecting American control and settlement in the Northwest Territory, a confederation of Great Lakes tribes, including Detroit and St. Joseph Potawatomi, engaged in a campaign of violent raids that culminated into a series of battles, ultimately warranting …