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Mamkeznéwen [Moccasin]


One of the most prominent and competitive games among Potawatomi men is mamkeznéwen [moccasin]. Forming two teams, each are comprised of a finder/hider, scorekeeper, drummers and singers. Using theatrics, each team is tasked with hiding a small token under one of four moccasins in an attempt to disguise its location and confuse opponents. With the token concealed, drummers and singers …

Massaw


Massaw was an influential and distinguished woman among the Wabash Potawatomi. Her presence and words carried weight in councils, a right customarily reserved for men. She descended from a line of leadership, as her father Wassato was also a respected ogema (leader). Massaw resided in the village of headman Giwani, her cabin reserved for the mediation of both tribal and …

McCartney, Edward


McCartney was a trader and business partner of Alexis Coquillard. Through his dealings with local Potawatomi, he married Mary Ann Benache, daughter of headman Benache or Segnak.

Medicine Wheel


Our bmadzewen [existence] is built on a sacred principle of four. Our medicines, lifecycles, directional powers, and the creation and destruction of worlds are connected through this belief, symbolized by our medicine wheel. Color: White [each color represents the four races of man Creator placed on earth] Direction: Wech-ksenyak [North] Season: Bbon [Winter] Life Cycle: Elder Medicine: Wishkpemishkos [Sweetgrass] Element: …

Metea [To Sulk]


Metea was a highly celebrated warrior and leader among the Indiana and Illinois Potawatomi. His village, known as Meskwawasebyéton, was located near Fort Wayne, Indiana. As a warrior, Metea was instrumental in numerous campaigns against the encroaching Americans. He was an active leader during the War of 1812 and a valued ally to Shawnee leader Tecumseh. His reputation as a …

Milwaukee


For millennia, Native communities have occupied the southern region of Wisconsin the area that would become Milwaukee. In the early 17th century, Potawatomi refugees fleeing Iroquoian raiding parties in central Michigan, established settlements in the Green Bay and Milwaukee areas. As the settlements grew into large trade centers, French-Canadian explorers and traders were lured to the area known by the …

Mnokme [Spring]


Mnokme was the time when the spirits reawakened and life was restored. The thunder of approaching storms was believed to be the mnedok (spirits) returning home. Ceremonies were performed thanking the spirits for their winter protection and for fertility as new life emerged. The Potawatomi new year began with Nmébnégises (Sucker Fish Moon). As the rivers and lakes thawed the …

Mnomen [Wild Rice]


Traditionally, the transition from niben [summer] to dgwaget [fall] was known as Nibnegises [Ripening Moon], the time of year when Potawatomi and other Neshnabek migrated to their annual menomen [wild rice] camps for harvest. A primary food staple, wild rice was extensively traded among Algonquin tribes and foreign merchants. Aside from diet, it was used medicinally and spiritually in various …

Mshkeke mzen’egen [Medical Journal]


13in L x 8.5in W x 1.5in H The 234-page medical journal was researched and recorded by Joseph Napoleon Bourassa, who studied medicine at the Choctaw Academy and had close relationships with traditional medicine men before and after removal. Listed are health conditions and their medicinal therapies. Each treatment is recorded as a recipe, noting wild plants harvested and processed. …

Mzenchegen [Statue]


15.5in H x 12in W The bronze statue titled, The Future Begins Now, was created by CPN tribal member Clyde B. Slavin in 2004. It depicts an important portion of the Neshnabé/Bodéwadmi Flood story, where the Muskrat places a piece of earth on the Turtle’s back to create a new world. Note from the artist reads: The Future Begins Now, …