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Indian Removal Act


In the years after the defeat of the British and their Indian allies in the War of 1812, the nature of the U.S. government’s Indian policy and the goal of treaty-making became increasingly hostile toward Native Americans, opening the door for the removals of the 1830s. The federal government was no longer interested in negotiating treaties that just arranged for …

Metea [To Sulk]


Metea was a highly celebrated warrior and leader among the Indiana and Illinois Potawatomi. His village, known as Meskwawasebyéton, was located near Fort Wayne, Indiana. As a warrior, Metea was instrumental in numerous campaigns against the encroaching Americans. He was an active leader during the War of 1812 and a valued ally to Shawnee leader Tecumseh. His reputation as a …

Neswake [Fletcher of Arrows]


Neswake was a leader of much influence and distinguished orator among the Wabash Potawatomi. He served as principle speaker for the Indiana Potawatomi during land cession and removal negotiations. Neswake gave the keynote address at the 1837 Keewaunay emigration council, expressing grievances and deep concern regarding the survival of his people post-removal. Despite his mixed opposition to removal, his name …

Nibosh [Humble Death or Twisted Head]


A warrior of great distinction among the Wabash Potawatomi of Indiana, Nibosh was a veteran of the Battle of Tippecanoe (1811) and the greater War of 1812. His name, translated as Humble Death or Twisted Head, indicated both his prowess in battle and physical appearance, due to the numerous injuries he sustained. After being captured and scalped during an inter-tribal …