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Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 10 Nov. 1838


Saturday, 10 Nov. 1838 “The settlements with the teamsters and officers were concluded today.Tomorrow we set out for home every thing having resulted as well and as happily as could have been anticipated by the most sanguine.” “I believe the foregoing journal to be correct in every thing pertaining to distances, localities, etc., etc.” J.C. Douglass,Enroll. Agent Scale of Distances …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 7 Nov. 1838


Wednesday, 7 Nov. 1838 Diary of William Polke “Travelled from Bulltown encampment to McLean’s Grove, a distance of twenty five miles. It had snowed the night previous and continued most of the day, which was very windy and excessively cold. But a small number of the teams kept in company—most of them selecting their own routes.”

Diary of William Polke – Monday, 5 Nov. 1838


Monday, 5 Nov. 1838 “The day was consumed in making settlements with the officers. During the afternoon a considerable number of the Indians assembled at headquarters and expressed a desire to be heard in a speech.” “Pe-pish-kay rose and in substance said – ‘That they had now arrived at their journey’s end—that the government must now be satisfied. They had …

Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 3 Nov. 1838


Saturday, 3 Nov. 1838 “At an early hour we left our encampment at Oak Grove, and travelled until two o’clock when we reached a settlement of Wea Indians on Bull creek, and camped adjoining Bulltown.” “Our journey was pleasant, and was marked by the anxiety of the Indians to push forward and see their friends. During the evening an attempt …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 31 Oct. 1838


Wednesday, 31 Oct. 1838 “Left encampment this morning at half after seven o’clock—the company under Capt. Hull being attached to the emigration—and at 12 o’clock passed Independence. At one we reached our present encampment two miles south of Independence, and ten miles from the camp of yesterday.” “After reaching camp in the evening a small quantity of shoes were distributed …

Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 27 Oct. 1838


Saturday, 27 Oct. 1838 “At sunrise the ferry boats were busily plying from shore to shore. As fast as the emigrants reached the southern bank they were hurried on their journey. At two o’clock the party were all over the river, and hastened to join the front of the emigration. At four o’clock the front of the party reached our …

Diary of William Polke – Monday, 29 Oct. 1838


Monday, 29 Oct. 1838 “At eight o’clock we resumed our journey—the morning being delightful and fine for travelling. At 12 we reached Prairie Creek, 10 miles from Schuy Creek. Subsistence flour, corn-meal, beef and pork and game of every kind. Forage, corn, hay and fodder.” “About five o’clock Capt. Hull arrived in camp with the Indians left at Logansport and …

Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 27 Oct. 1838


Saturday, 27 Oct. 1838 “At sunrise the ferry boats were busily plying from shore to shore. As fast as the emigrants reached the southern bank they were hurried on their journey.  At two o’clock the party were all over the river, and hastened to join the front of the emigration. At four o’clock the front of the party reached our …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 24 October 1838


Wednesday, 24 October 1838 “This morning before leaving camp a quantity of shoes were distributed among the indigent and barefooted Indians, the weather being too severe for marching without a covering to the feet.” “At eight o’clock we left Thomas’ encampment, and at 12 reached Carrollton, near which place we are now encamped. Distance 12 miles. Nothing occurred on the …

Diary of William Polke – Monday, 22 October 1838


Monday, 22 October 1838 “At an early hour this morning we left our encampment, and passing through Keatsville (Keytesville), journeyed towards the Missouri River. At two o’clock p.m. we reached Grand River, preparations for the ferriage of which had before been made, and immediately commenced its crossing.” “By dark all the Indians and many of the wagons were over. The …