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Diary of William Polke – Monday, 29 Oct. 1838


“At eight o’clock we resumed our journey—the morning being delightful and fine for travelling. At 12 we reached Prairie Creek, 10 miles from Schuy Creek. Subsistence flour, corn-meal, beef and pork and game of every kind. Forage, corn, hay and fodder.” “About five o’clock Capt. Hull arrived in camp with the Indians left at Logansport and Tippecanoe, numbering in all …

Diary of William Polke – Friday, 14 Sept. 1838


Diary of William Polke Friday, 14 Sept. 1838 “Left Lagrange encampment at an early hour and proceeded at a quick pace on our journey—passing over a dry and seemingly unhealthy portion of the country. Our party continues to mend in health. Occasionally however, and indeed not unfrequently, persons thro’ weariness and fatigue take sick along the route. This occupies much …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 12 Sept. 1838


Wednesday, 12 Sept. 1838 “At half past 8 o’clock we struck our tents and started on the march. At 11 we reached and forded the Tippecanoe River. A little after 12 we passed the Battle Ground and at one arrived at our present encampment (Battle Ground).“ “Distance from the encampment of yesterday fifteen miles. Immediately after our arrival the Indians …

Chronicling the Potawatomi Trail of Death


Diary of William Polke Tuesday, 4 Sept. 1838 Wednesday, 5 Sept. 1838 Friday, 7 Sept. 1838 Sunday, 9 Sept. 1838 Monday, 10 Sept. 1838 Wednesday, 12 Sept. 1838 Thursday 13 Sept. 1838 Friday, 14 Sept. 1838 Saturday, 15 Sept. 1838 Tuesday, 18 Sept. 1838 Wednesday, 19 Sept. 1838 Saturday, 22 Sept. 1838 Monday, 24 Sept. 1838 Wednesday, 26 Sept. 1838 …

Diary of William Polke – Monday, 10 Sept. 1838


Monday, 10 Sept. 1838 “The morning was early employed in preparations for a removal. Nothing of any note occurred during the morning. At 10 o’clock we got under way and proceeded on our journey, leaving behind us of sick and attendan[ts] two. The day was hot—we had the advantage [how]ever, of being in the vicinity of water, our route lying …

Diary of William Polke – Sunday, 9 Sept. 1838


Sunday, 9 Sept. 1838 “Physicians came into camp today, and reported three hundred cases of sickness, generally of a temporary character, and which they are of opinion, may be removed by a two-day course of medicine. A kind of medical hospital has been erected today, which is likely to facilitate the course of medical regime proposed by the physicians. A …

Diary of William Polke – Friday, 7 Sept. 1838


Friday, 7 Sept. 1838 “Two wagons with the thirteen persons left at Chippeway arrived in camp today. Kock-koch-kee, with his party consisting of fifteen persons, as also Co-co-ta, Che-shaw-gen, Way-wa-he-as-shuk and Pawk-shuk, with their families, making in all eighteen persons, came into camp today. A child died this morning.”

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 5 Sept. 1838


Wednesday, 5 Sept. 1838 *During the night of the 4th at the encampment at Chippeway, twenty persons affected their escape—stealing two horses from the Indians remaining behind, and have not since been heard of. “Fifty-one persons were found to be unable to continue the journey, the means of transportation not being at hand—they were therefore left, the most of them …

Diary of William Polke – Tuesday, 4 Sept. 1838


Tuesday, 4 Sept. 1838 “Left encampment at Twin Lakes at half past nine o’clock a.m. leaving behind on account of sickness of the chief San-ga-na, with his family consisting of thirteen persons, three of whom are very sick, and proceeded on our march. Messrs. Wheeler & Hopkins agree to furnish provisions during the sickness of the family, and until such …

Dancing for my Tribe


Dancing for my Tribe “The whole idea of my project is to capture the essence of Potawatomi traditions and create a place in history for the Tribe. Preserving the faces, stories, and regalia of modern Potawatomi will contribute to a better understanding of their transformed place in the diverse life of America.” Sharon Hoogstraten, a Citizen Potawatomi Nation member and …