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Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 10 Nov. 1838


Saturday, 10 Nov. 1838 “The settlements with the teamsters and officers were concluded today.Tomorrow we set out for home every thing having resulted as well and as happily as could have been anticipated by the most sanguine.” “I believe the foregoing journal to be correct in every thing pertaining to distances, localities, etc., etc.” J.C. Douglass,Enroll. Agent Scale of Distances …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 7 Nov. 1838


Wednesday, 7 Nov. 1838 Diary of William Polke “Travelled from Bulltown encampment to McLean’s Grove, a distance of twenty five miles. It had snowed the night previous and continued most of the day, which was very windy and excessively cold. But a small number of the teams kept in company—most of them selecting their own routes.”

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 26 Sept. 1838


Wednesday, 26 Sept. 1838 “Left our encampment at the crossing at 8 o’clock in the morning and proceeded on our route. The sick appear somewhat recruited. Owing to the indisposition of our physician no report has been made since Monday. We have reason to believe that the health of the camp is returning.” “The weather still continues delightful—the roads, however, …

Diary of William Polke – Monday, 24 Sept. 1838


Monday, 24 Sept. 1838 “At 9 this morning we left Pyatt’s Point, Ill. (the encampment of yesterday) and proceeded down the Sangamon River fifteen miles, to the place of our present Encampment, Sangamon Crossing. “ “Physician reports “there have been two deaths since my last, and the situation of several of the sick is much worse. I would recommend that …

Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 22 Sept. 1838


Saturday, 22 Sept. 1838 “At 8 o’clock we left our encampment and entered the prairie at Sidney. The day was exceedingly cold. The night previous had brought us quite a heavy rain, and the morning came in cold and blustry. Our journey was immediately across the prairie, which at this point is entirely divested of timber for sixteen miles. The …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 19 Sept. 1838


Wednesday, 19 Sept. 1838 “The business for which we remained yesterday in camp, is but half concluded. The sick require active treatment such as they cannot receive whilst on the march. We remain today.” “To-morrow morning most of the volunteers will be discharged, when we expect to proceed on our way. The report of the physicians varies but little from …

Diary of William Polke – Tuesday, 18 Sept. 1838


Diary of William Polke Tuesday, 18 Sept. 1838 “The accumulation of business, together with the discharge of a number of troops in service, rendered it necessary that we should remain in camp a day or so—beside which the weak condition of many of the emigrants demanded rest.” “During the evening a woman and a child died. A child was also …

Diary of William Polke – Saturday, 15 Sept. 1838


Saturday, 15 Sept. 1838 “Early on this morning we were on our way, and travelled without interruption unit 12 o’clock. When we arrived at an unhealthy and filthy looking stream, at which, from the reports of the citizens of the country, we were forced to encamp. The young men among the Indians during the afternoon, to the number of twenty-five, …

Diary of William Polke – Thursday 13 Sept. 1838


Thursday 13 Sept. 1838 “We commenced our journey this morning about nine o’clock, and after traveling until four this afternoon, reached the encampment near Lagrange—some 18 miles from the camp of yesterday. With the exception of the sultry heat of noon-day and the excessive dust of the roads, our marches are very pleasant. This evening two neighboring physicians, Drs. Ritchie …

Diary of William Polke – Wednesday, 12 Sept. 1838


Wednesday, 12 Sept. 1838 “At half past 8 o’clock we struck our tents and started on the march. At 11 we reached and forded the Tippecanoe River. A little after 12 we passed the Battle Ground and at one arrived at our present encampment (Battle Ground).“ “Distance from the encampment of yesterday fifteen miles. Immediately after our arrival the Indians …